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Saufley DD-465 - History

Saufley DD-465 - History


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Saufley DD-465

Saufley(DD-465: dp. 2,050; 1. 376'6"; b. 39'8"; dr. 17'9"; s. 37 k.; cpl. 319; a. 5 5", 10 40mm., 7 20mm., 2 dct. 6 dcp., 10 21" tt.; cl. Fletcher)Saufley (DD-465) was laid down on 27 January 1942 by the Federal Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Kearney, N.J.; launched on 19 July 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Helen O'R. Scruggs, and commissioned on 29 August 19-12, Lt. Comdr. Bert F. Brown in command.Following shakedown off northern New England, Saufley made several coastal escort runs and then prepared for duty in the South Pacific. She departed Norfolk on 9 September. Arriving at Noumea, New Caledonia, on 2 December, Saupey commenced participation in the Guadalcanal campaign three days later.Initially assigned to escort reinforcements from Espiritu Santo to Lunga Point, Saufley soon undertook antishipping sweeps in the waters north and west of Guadalcanal and conducted shore bombardment missions against enemy positions on the island. During the Japanese evacuation of Guadalcanal in late January and early February 1943, Saudey operated with Task Force 11. On 19 February, she sailed for Lunga Roads to join with other units staging for Operation "Cleanslate," the occupation of the Russells.During that operation, Saufley transported troops, towed landing craft to the target islands, and provided shore bombardment in support of the troops as they landed on Pavuvu and Banika islands on the 21st. From these islands, planes would be able to cover operations against Rendova.In March, Saupey resumed escort and antisubmarine duties in the southern Solomons—New Caledonia—New Hebrides area. Following an abbreviated availability at Sydney, Australia, she returned to Noumea and resumed escort work until the end of June. On the 30th as Allied forces moved toward Rendova, Saudey bombarded Japanese shore installations there.July and August found Saufley engaged in assault operations agamst New Georgia and escort missions to the New Hebrides and Vella Lavella. On 31 August, she received minor damage, but no casualties, from near misses by shore batteries in the "Slot " the narrow body of water that separates the eentrai Solomons.At 1011 on 15 September, while Saudey was en route to Espiritu Santo in company with Montgomery (DD121) and two merchantmen, a torpedo wake was sighted. As Montgomery's sound gear was inoperative, Saufley initiated a search down the track of the torpedo wake. Over the period of the next three and onehalf hours, she delivered five separate depth charge attacks against the submarine. At 1443, the Japanese submarine, RO-101, surfaced.Saufley's five-inch batteries and machine guns opened up on the conning tower of the submarine. A Catalina flying boat moved in and crapped two depth charges. The first charge missed the target by about 40 feet, but the second one hit it. When the splash subsided, the submarine was gone. An underwater explosion was heard; and, by 1735, diesel oil, covering an area of approximately one square mile, marked the grave of RO-l01During the remainder of September and well into October, Saudey was engaged in night antibarge patrols between Kolombangara and Choiseul. She sank four barges during this period but sustained damage from Japanese aerial bombs on the night of 1 October which resulted in the death of two erew members and the wounding of 11 others.The months of November and December 1943 and January 1944 found Saufley performing escort duties for the reinforcement of Bougainville. In February, Saufley was engaged in the assault on the Green Islands which broke the Japanese Rabaul-Buka supply line and provided the Ahlies with another airfield near Rabaul. Antisubmarine patrols were followed by eall fire support missions during the occupation of Emirau Island. This action, which completed the "ring around Rabaul," took Saugey into April. She had returned to the F:mirau-Massau area when, on the morning of the 7th, she gained eontaet on a submerged submarine. Forty-five minutes and 18 depth charges later, twounderwater explosions were heard. Within hours, oil covered the area. Postwar review of Japanese records identified the sunken submarine as I-2. Following Escort duties to the Admiralties, Saudey returned to Purvis Bay on the 18th whence she conducted exercises with TF 38 into May.On 4 May, the destroyer sailed for Pearl Harbor. Arriving on the 12th, she sailed west again on 1 June as a unit of Task Group 51.18, the reserve force for Operation "Forager," the conquest of the Marianas. On D-day plus 1, 16 June, Saufley and the other escorts shepherded their charges into the transport unloading area west of Saipan. Saugey was then reassigned to eall fire support duties. For the next month, she continued eall fire support, screening, and shore bombardment operations in the Saipan-Tinian area. On 20 July, Sauliey moved south for the invasion of Guam. Here, the destroyer provided call fire support for the assault troops. She returned to Tinian on the 23d and supported the landings there on the 24th. For the next week, she provided gunfire support and served on radar picket duty.Remaining in the Marianas until 12 August, the destroyer then sailed for California, arriving at San Franeiseo with her squadron, Destroyer Squadron (DesRon) 22, at the end of the month. Overhaul took her into October. On the 26th, she again steamed west.On 17 November, she arrived at Ulithi Atoll. Proeeeding to Leyte Gulf, Saufley soon found herself engaged in antisubmarine action after moving into the Camotes Sea to search for a submarine reported to be in the area. Shortly after entering the area on the 28th, the Japanese submarine was located on the surface off Pilar Point, Ponson Island. In a multi-destroyer gun action involving Saufley, Renshaw (DD499), and Wailer (DD-466), the submarine was sunk 45 minutes later.Returning to Leyte Gulf, Saufley lost one man and suffered considerable hull damage in an engagement with enemy planes on the 29th. Following repairs at the Admiralties, she proceeded to a 2 January 1945 rendezvous with the Lingayan attack force. Moving into the Sulu Sea on the 7th, Saudey shot down an attacking Japanese aircraft at dusk on the 8th. On the morning of the 9th, the formation stood into Lingayen Gulf. Saufley provided screening services as the assault waves landed in the Langayen area. On the morning of the 10th, Saufl:ey splashed another aircraft, this time a Val attempting to erash the destroyer. Saufley got underway on the 12th to return to Leyte Gulf. From Leyte Gulf, she escorted a convoy to Morotai and returned on the 26th. Sailing for Luzon, Saufley arrived off Nasugbu to support the landing there on the 31st. On 1 February, she sank an attacking Japanese boat. She then eommeneed eall fire support which eontinued for four days. Sauftey then set a c ourse for Subie Bay.The balance of February and most of March was spent in support operations in the areas of Manila Bay and Mindoro. Saufley participated in amphibious operations at Sanga Sanga (31 March to 4 April) and Jolo (8 to 11 April) where she served as flagship, screening vessel, and eall fire support ship.The next two months found Saufley engaged in Escort duties. She participated in the assault against Balikpapan, Borneo, on 1 July. The destroyer returned to Morotai on 22 July. She engaged in escort work between Leyte Gulf and Ulithi until the end of hostilities in mid-August.In early September, Saudoy moved up to the Ryukyus and then proceeded to the China coast. She assisted in minesweeping operations in the Yangtze delta area. The destroyer remained off the coast of China until she departed for home on 12 November. Arriving at San Diego at the end of the year, Saudey continued on to the east coast in mid-January 1946. During February, she underwent repairs at the New YorkNaval Shipyard. In early March, Saudey headed south to C'harleston for inactivation.Decommissioned on 12 June 1946, Saufleg remained in the Reserve Fleet for just over three years. Redesignated DDE-465 on 15 March 1949, she was recommissioned on 15 December 1949 and assigned to Escort Destroyer Squadron (CortDesRon) 2, Atlantic Fleet. Within a year, she had participated in two search and rescue operations. The first, in June 1950, was the rescue of 36 passengers from a downed commercial airliner on a Puerto Rico-New York run. The second in October, was the rescue of a Navy TBM pilot assigned to Palau (CVE-122).On 1 January 1951, the escort destroyer was reclassified an Experimental Escort Destroyer, EDDE-465, and assigned to experimental work under the control of Commander, Operational Development Force. A unit of DesDiv 601, she was home ported at Key West, and for the next twelve years, was primarily engaged in testing and evaluating sonar equipment and antisubmarine warfare weapons.On 1 July 1962, Saufley was redesignated a general purpose destroyer and regained her original designation, DD-465. At the end of that month she partieipated in the filming of the movie "PT109." In September, she resumed test and evaluation work. In late October, she was placed on standby, and, after the proclamation of the Cuban Quarantine, she commenced patrols off the coast of Florida. She continued that duty until 20 November; then returned to Key West. On the 26th, she participated in a Presidential review of the Quarantine Force.For the next two years,Saufley continued her experimental projects, interrupting those operations only for scheduled exercises, sonar school ship duties, and, in the spring of 1963, assistance in the search for Thresher (SSN-593).Ordered back to Norfolk in the fall of 1964, Saufley was decommissioned on 29 January 1965. Her use as an experimental ship, however, continued. In 1967, instruments and gauges to register strain and stress of successive explosions were installed, and, in February 1968, as a result of tests, she was sunk off Key West.Saufley earned 16 battle stars during World War II.


Saufley was laid down on 27 January 1942 by the Federal Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey launched on 19 July 1942 sponsored by Saufley's widow, Mrs Helen (O’Rear) Scruggs (daughter of Judge Edward C. O’Rear of Frankfurt, Kentucky) [1] , commissioned 29 August 1942 with Lieutenant Commander Bert F. Brown in command.

Following shakedown off northern New England, Saufley made several coastal escort runs and then prepared for duty in the South Pacific. She departed Norfolk on 9 November. Arriving at Nouméa, New Caledonia, on 2 December, Saufley commenced participation in the Guadalcanal campaign three days later.

Initially assigned to escort reinforcements from Espiritu Santo to Lunga Point, Saufley soon undertook anti-shipping sweeps in the waters north and west of Guadalcanal and conducted shore bombardment missions against enemy positions on the island. During the Japanese evacuation of Guadalcanal in late January and early February 1943, Saufley operated with Task Force 11 (TF11). On 19 February, she sailed to join other units staging for Operation Cleanslate, the occupation of the Russell Islands.

During that operation, Saufley transported troops, towed landing craft to the target islands, and provided shore bombardment in support of the troops as they landed on Pavuvu and Banika islands on 21 February. From these islands, aircraft would be able to cover operations against Rendova.

In March, Saufley resumed escort and antisubmarine duties in the southern Solomons-New Caledonia-New Hebrides area. Following an abbreviated availability at Sydney, Australia, she returned to Nouméa and resumed escort work until the end of June. On 30 June, as Allied forces moved toward Rendova, where Saufley bombarded Japanese shore installations.

July and August found Saufley engaged in assault operations against New Georgia and escort missions to the New Hebrides and Vella Lavella. On 31 August, she received minor damage, but no casualties, from near misses by shore batteries in "the Slot".

At 10:11 on 15 September, while Saufley was en route to Espiritu Santo in company with Montgomery and two merchantmen, a torpedo wake was sighted. As Montgomery's sound gear was inoperative, Saufley initiated a search down the track of the torpedo wake. Over the period of the next three and one-half hours, she delivered five separate depth charge attacks against the submarine. At 14:43, Japanese submarine Ro-101, surfaced.

Saufley's five-inch (127   mm) batteries and machine guns opened up on the conning tower of the submarine. A PBY flying boat moved in and dropped two depth charges. The first missed, but the second hit the submarine, which disappeared beneath the surface at 14:46. Saufley ' s crew then heard a large underwater explosion, and by 17:35 a slick of diesel oil covered a 1-square-nautical-mile (3.4   km 2 1.3   sq   mi) area of the ocean's surface centered around 10䓹′S 163䓸′E  /  10.950°S 163.933°E  / -10.950 163.933  ( Ro-101 )

During the remainder of September and well into October, Saufley was engaged in night anti-barge patrols between Kolombangara and Choiseul. She sank four barges during this period but sustained damage from Japanese aerial bombs on the night of 1 October which resulted in the death of two and the wounding of 11 crew members.

The months of November and December 1943 and January 1944 found Saufley performing escort duties for the reinforcement of Bougainville. In February, Saufley was engaged in the assault on the Green Islands which broke the Japanese Rabaul-Buka supply line and provided the Allies with another airfield near Rabaul. Antisubmarine patrols were followed by call fire support missions during the occupation of Emirau Island. This action, which completed the "ring around Rabaul", took Saufley into April. She had returned to the Emirau-Mussau area when, on the morning of 7 April, she gained contact on a submerged submarine. Forty-five minutes and 18 depth charges later, two underwater explosions were heard. Within hours, oil covered the area. Postwar review of Japanese records identified the sunken submarine as the Type J1 submarine Japanese submarine   I-2. Following escort duties to the Admiralties, Saufley returned to Purvis Bay on 18 April whence she conducted exercises with TF 38 into May.

On 4 May, the destroyer sailed for Pearl Harbor. Arriving on 12 May, she sailed west again on 1 June as a unit of Task Group 51.18 (TG 51.18), the reserve force for Operation Forager, the conquest of the Marianas. On D-Day plus 1, 16 June, Saufley and the other escorts shepherded their charges into the transport unloading area west of Saipan. Saufley was then reassigned to call fire support duties. For the next month, she continued call fire support, screening, and shore bombardment operations in the Saipan-Tinian area. On 20 July, Saufley moved south for the invasion of Guam. Here, the destroyer provided call fire support for the assault troops. She returned to Tinian on the 23d and supported the landings there on 24 July. For the next week, she provided gunfire support and served on radar picket duty.

Remaining in the Marianas until 12 August, the destroyer then sailed for California, arriving at San Francisco with her squadron, Destroyer Squadron 22 (DesRon 22), at the end of the month. Overhaul took her into October. On 26 October, she again steamed west.

On 17 November, she arrived at Ulithi Atoll. Proceeding to Leyte Gulf, Saufley soon found herself engaged in antisubmarine action after moving into the Camotes Sea to search for a submarine reported to be in the area. Shortly after entering the area on 28 November, Japanese Type C2 submarine I-46 [2] was located on the surface off Pilar Point, Ponson Island. In a multi-destroyer gun action involving Saufley, Renshaw, Waller, and Pringle   (DD-477) , [2] the submarine was sunk 45 minutes later. [2] : 585 It is also reported that the I-46 was possibly sunk by USS   Gridley and USS   Helm on October 28, 1944. [2] : 567

Returning to Leyte Gulf, Saufley lost one man and suffered considerable hull damage in an engagement with a kamikaze attack on 29 November. [2] : 585

Following repairs at the Admiralties, she proceeded to a 2 January 1945 rendezvous with the Lingayen attack force. Moving into the Sulu Sea on the 7th, Saufley shot down an attacking Japanese aircraft at dusk on the 8th. On the morning of 9 January, the formation stood into Lingayen Gulf. Saufley provided screening services as the assault waves landed in the Lingayen area. On the morning of 10 January, Saufley claimed a Val attempting to crash into the destroyer. Saufley got underway on 12 January to return to Leyte Gulf. From Leyte Gulf, she escorted a convoy to Morotai and returned on 26 January. Sailing for Luzon, Saufley arrived off Nasugbu to support the landing there on 31 January. On 1 February, she sank an attacking Japanese boat. She then commenced call fire support which continued for four days. Saufley then set a course for Subic Bay.

The balance of February and most of March was spent in support operations in the areas of Manila Bay and Mindoro. Saufley participated in amphibious operations at Sanga-Sanga (31 March to 4 April) and Jolo (8 to 11 April) where she served as flagship, screening vessel, and call fire support ship.

The next two months found Saufley engaged in escort duties. She participated in the assault against Balikpapan, Borneo, on 1 July. The destroyer returned to Morotai on 22 July. She engaged in escort work between Leyte Gulf and Ulithi until the end of hostilities in mid-August.

In early September 1945, Saufley moved up to the Ryukyu Islands and then proceeded to the China coast. She assisted in minesweeping operations in the Yangtze delta area. The destroyer remained off the coast of China until she departed for home on 12 November. Arriving at San Diego at the end of the year, Saufley continued on to the east coast in mid-January 1946. During February, she underwent repairs at the New York Naval Shipyard. In early March, Saufley headed south to Charleston for inactivation.


Welcome to the USS Saufley DD-465 Guestbook Forum

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Alan H. Keith
Years Served: 1960 - 1962
Just dropped in to say Hi to all the guys I served with on the Saufley. Don't know how many are still around or that remember me. I was in the Sonar Gang. Grady &amp Butler were the 1st &amp 2nd Class leaders when I first got on. Then Smiley was our leader for awhile before Schierenbech? took over. I got out in August of 1962. Enjoyed most of my time on the ship. It was a great expirience and time in my life. Some other names I remember: Stuart, Ames, Vuciznic, Sanderson, and MacIntyer, for a few. A lot of other names escape me now, but I still can see their faces. I'd be happy to hear from any of you who remember me.

Robey Hamby
Years Served: 1960-1962
My brothers Ralph Hamby, Jim Hamby and brother-in-law Jesse Salas were all aboard the USS Saufley

John Lally
Years Served: Two !945 - 1946
Went to boot camp in Sampson NY and also went to Electrician school there. Served on the USS Saufley in late 1944 into 1945 first as a Fireman and ended up as 3rd Class Electrician Mate. Sailed into Shanghia, China frquently and finaly sailed back throuh the Panama Canal to the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

Is there someone from the Saufley who was aboard during the time above that can respond to me in my Email address above.

Served on board 1954-1956 as radioman during which time the USS Saufley was EDDE 465 home port Keywest Fl.


USS Saufley DD465

This is an official overview of the adequacy available of facilities for the crew of the USS Saufley DD-465, a destroyer converted after World War II to an antisubmarine warfare ship (DDE) and later to EDDE.

Film produced by the Naval Photographic Center, NAS Anacostia, Anacostia, DC, 1952.

This film was produced for the purpose of showing Congress that the budget for better (and bigger) facilities for the crew were not just needed, but imperative.

History of USS Saufley, per the information provided by “braintrusts”:

Saufley earned 16 battle stars during World War II, making her one of the most decorated US ships of World War II. US Navy Documentary about living conditions aboard this Fletcher Class Destroyer.

Saufley was re-designated a DDE in 1949 and then an EDDE (experimental) and used for experimenting with new Sonar systems until 1962 when reclassified as a DD, then participating in the movie PT109 as well as the Blockade of Cuba.

Saufley served admirably in the Pacific in WWII, instrumental in the sinking of two Japanese submarines as well as participating in several key operations. The future Commander, Naval Opertions, Admiral Elmo Zumwalt was Executive Officer of the Saufley 1945 – 46.

If you read the comments on Youtube, there are some from ex-crew members who served on ships like Saufley, and one who was a Sonarman aboard Saufley in 1962.

And sailors think they have it rough now? I think they should take a gander at how things used to be. Maybe they could run this by recruits at Great Mistakes, in case any of them are whining about “accommodations”.


USS Saufley DD-465 (1942-1968)

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Saufley DD-465 - History

Stanford got its name after Benjamin Logan, who along with other early settlers, repeatedly and successfully fought off Indian attacks. Logan's Fort, which was located near the existing Stanford downtown district, was the final jewel of the "triple crown" of forts in Kentucky. Cumberland Trace which goes to Nashville and turns into the Natchez Trace, began at Logan's Fort. Court was held within the walls of the fort from 1781 to 1783, the original beginnings of many Kentucky counties south of the Kentucky River. The settlement, which evolved into the present day town of Stanford is the second oldest permanent settlement in the state. Historic downtown Stanford is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Lincoln County's rich heritage is revealed in its vast array of communities. Preachersville is the only community so named in the United States. The first settlers were part of a traveling church, Gospel Christian Church (also known as Halls Gap Christian Church). The church bell is 203 years old. Carrie Nation and U.S. Ambassador to Russia, Carlos Brittain, once lived in the area. The old Waynesburg Bank and Post Office stands in the center of two cross streets which entirely surround it. Waynesburg Masonic Lodge holds the oldest continuous charter in Lincoln County. Hubble was settled by the Irish and Scotch. The McKendree Methodist Church, built in 1886, is one of the oldest in the county. Eubank is home of the 1944 Miss America.

Lt. Richard Caswell Saufley was born and reared in Stanford. This pioneer aviator was the first man to fly an American plane over enemy territory, the first to be filmed in action in a war plane, the first to fly a plane off the deck of a ship, and he set world endurance and altitude records. Named in his honor are NAS Saufley Field in Pensacola, Florida and U.S. Navy Destroyer, U.S.S. Saufley, DD-465.

Come see where the past meets the present in historic Lincoln County Kentucky's rich heritage awaits you in "The Land of Firsts." Be sure to check out the Sites page for great ideas of places to visit.


Contents

Following shakedown off northern New England, Saufley made several coastal escort runs and then prepared for duty in the South Pacific. She departed Norfolk on 9 November. Arriving at Nouméa, New Caledonia, on 2 December, Saufley commenced participation in the Guadalcanal campaign three days later.

Initially assigned to escort reinforcements from Espiritu Santo to Lunga Point, Saufley soon undertook antishipping sweeps in the waters north and west of Guadalcanal and conducted shore bombardment missions against enemy positions on the island. During the Japanese evacuation of Guadalcanal in late January and early February 1943, Saufley operated with Task Force 11 (TF11). On 19 February, she sailed for Lunga Roads to join with other units staging for Operation Cleanslate, the occupation of the Russell Islands.

During that operation, Saufley transported troops, towed landing craft to the target islands, and provided shore bombardment in support of the troops as they landed on Pavuvu and Banika islands on 21 February. From these islands, planes would be able to cover operations against Rendova.

In March, Saufley resumed escort and antisubmarine duties in the southern Solomons-New Caledonia-New Hebrides area. Following an abbreviated availability at Sydney, Australia, she returned to Nouméa and resumed escort work until the end of June. On 30 June, as Allied forces moved toward Rendova, Saufley bombarded Japanese shore installations there.

July and August found Saufley engaged in assault operations against New Georgia and escort missions to the New Hebrides and Vella Lavella. On 31 August, she received minor damage, but no casualties, from near misses by shore batteries in "the Slot".

At 10:11 on 15 September, while Saufley was en route to Espiritu Santo in company with Montgomery and two merchantmen, a torpedo wake was sighted. As Montgomery's sound gear was inoperative, Saufley initiated a search down the track of the torpedo wake. Over the period of the next three and one-half hours, she delivered five separate depth charge attacks against the submarine. At 14:43, the Japanese submarine RO-101, surfaced.

Saufley's five-inch (127 mm) batteries and machine guns opened up on the conning tower of the submarine. A PBY flying boat moved in and dropped two depth charges. The first charge missed the target by about 40 feet (12 m), but the second one hit it. When the splash subsided, the submarine was gone. An underwater explosion was heard and, by 17:35, diesel oil, covering an area of approximately one square mile (2.6 km²), marked the grave of RO-101.

During the remainder of September and well into October, Saufley was engaged in night antibarge patrols between Kolombangara and Choiseul. She sank four barges during this period but sustained damage from Japanese aerial bombs on the night of 1 October which resulted in the death of two crew members and the wounding of 11 others.

The months of November and December 1943 and January 1944 found Saufley performing escort duties for the reinforcement of Bougainville. In February, Saufley was engaged in the assault on the Green Islands which broke the Japanese Rabaul-Buka supply line and provided the Allies with another airfield near Rabaul. Antisubmarine patrols were followed by call fire support missions during the occupation of Emirau Island. This action, which completed the "ring around Rabaul", took Saufley into April. She had returned to the Emirau-Mussau area when, on the morning of 7 April, she gained contact on a submerged submarine. Forty-five minutes and 18 depth charges later, two underwater explosions were heard. Within hours, oil covered the area. Postwar review of Japanese records identified the sunken submarine as Japanese submarine I-2. Following escort duties to the Admiralties, Saufley returned to Purvis Bay on 18 April whence she conducted exercises with TF 38 into May.

On 4 May, the destroyer sailed for Pearl Harbor. Arriving on 12 May, she sailed west again on 1 June as a unit of Task Group 51.18 (TG 51.18), the reserve force for Operation Forager, the conquest of the Marianas. On D-Day plus 1, 16 June, Saufley and the other escorts shepherded their charges into the transport unloading area west of Saipan. Saufley was then reassigned to call fire support duties. For the next month, she continued call fire support, screening, and shore bombardment operations in the Saipan-Tinian area. On 20 July, Saufley moved south for the invasion of Guam. Here, the destroyer provided call fire support for the assault troops. She returned to Tinian on the 23d and supported the landings there on 24 July. For the next week, she provided gunfire support and served on radar picket duty.

Remaining in the Marianas until 12 August, the destroyer then sailed for California, arriving at San Francisco with her squadron, Destroyer Squadron 22 (DesRon 22), at the end of the month. Overhaul took her into October. On 26 October, she again steamed west.

On 17 November, she arrived at Ulithi Atoll. Proceeding to Leyte Gulf, Saufley soon found herself engaged in antisubmarine action after moving into the Camotes Sea to search for a submarine reported to be in the area. Shortly after entering the area on 28 November, Japanese submarine I-46 [1] was located on the surface off Pilar Point, Ponson Island. In a multi-destroyer gun action involving Saufley, Renshaw, Waller, and Pringle (DD-477), [1] the submarine was sunk 45 minutes later.

On 29 November, Saufley was damaged in a kamikaze attack in Leyte Gulf. [1]

Returning to Leyte Gulf, Saufley lost one man and suffered considerable hull damage in an engagement with enemy planes on 29 November. Following repairs at the Admiralties, she proceeded to a 2 January 1945 rendezvous with the Lingayen attack force. Moving into the Sulu Sea on the 7th, Saufley shot down an attacking Japanese aircraft at dusk on the 8th. On the morning of 9 January, the formation stood into Lingayen Gulf. Saufley provided screening services as the assault waves landed in the Lingayen area. On the morning of 10 January, Saufley splashed another aircraft, this time a Val attempting to crash the destroyer. Saufley got underway on 12 January to return to Leyte Gulf. From Leyte Gulf, she escorted a convoy to Morotai and returned on 26 January. Sailing for Luzon, Saufley arrived off Nasugbu to support the landing there on 31 January. On 1 February, she sank an attacking Japanese boat. She then commenced call fire support which continued for four days. Saufley then set a course for Subic Bay.

The balance of February and most of March was spent in support operations in the areas of Manila Bay and Mindoro. Saufley participated in amphibious operations at Sanga-Sanga (31 March to 4 April) and Jolo (8 to 11 April) where she served as flagship, screening vessel, and call fire support ship.

The next two months found Saufley engaged in escort duties. She participated in the assault against Balikpapan, Borneo, on 1 July. The destroyer returned to Morotai on 22 July. She engaged in escort work between Leyte Gulf and Ulithi until the end of hostilities in mid-August.

In early September 1945, Saufley moved up to the Ryukyu Islands and then proceeded to the China coast. She assisted in minesweeping operations in the Yangtze delta area. The destroyer remained off the coast of China until she departed for home on 12 November. Arriving at San Diego at the end of the year, Saufley continued on to the east coast in mid-January 1946. During February, she underwent repairs at the New York Naval Shipyard. In early March, Saufley headed south to Charleston for inactivation.


Post WWII 1940s - 1950s

  • 7 Dec 1941: Two detachments of aircraft had been sent to Johnston Island and Palmyra Island the day before, and on the 7th began to practice circular patrol pattern searches. On that same morning, Japanese carrier forces attacked Pearl Harbor, destroying eight of the squadron’s aircraft in their hangars on Ford Island.
  • 6 Aug 1942: Lieutenant Maurice "Snuffy" Smith and his crew of seven were reported missing after a patrol flown out of Espiritu Santo. On 14 January 1994, a team of loggers discovered the remains of the aircraft, BuNo. 2389, and its crew where they had crashed on a ridge of a hill on the island of Espiritu Santo.
  • 15 Sep 1943: A squadron PBY-5 Catalina piloted by Lieutenant W. J. Geritz spotted a submarine southeast of San Cristobal. The destroyer Saufley (DD 465) assisted in the sinking of the submarine. Postwar records indicate the submarine sunk was RO-101 and the entire crew of 50 was lost.
  • 18 Sep 1943: VP-23 conducted a bombing attack on Japanese positions at Nauru Island.
  • 30 Nov 1944: VPB-23 conducted a bombing attack on Japanese positions on Wake Island.
  • 1 Sep 1945: On this date detachments were maintained at Peleliu Island, Palau Falalop Island, Ulithi and Agana Field, Guam. Primary missions conducted consisted of air-sea rescue work, antimine sweeps and leaflet drops on bypassed Japanese held islands.
  • 13 Dec 1945: Squadron operations were ended and all detachments were returned to Tanapag Harbor, Saipan. Shortly thereafter, the squadron departed Saipan to return to San Diego, Calif., via Kaneohe, Hawaii.
  • 25 Jan 1946: VPB-23 was disestablished at NAS San Diego, Calif.
  • 1 Jul 1950: VP-23 surveyed the Gulf Stream in Operation Cabot, in support of San Pablo (AVP 30). The squadron recorded color changes in the gulf, took APS-15 radar signatures, and noted LORAN fixes on surface and subsurface features. During the operation at least one aircraft was designated to provide weather reconnaissance for the surface vessels participating in the project.
  • 9 May 1952: VP-23 was transferred from NAS Miami, Fla., to a new permanent home base at NAS Brunswick, Maine, under the operational control of FAW-3. Although the squadron was transferred, 7 officers and 109 enlisted personnel remained at NAS Miami to form VJ-2, a weather squadron that took the place of VP-23. Shortly after the transfer, the squadron was equipped with PB4Y-2 aircraft that were soon redesignated P4Y-2S, fitted with antisubmarine radar.
  • 19 May 1952: VP-23 deployed to Argentia, Newfoundland, for three months of advanced base training in cold weather operations, relieving VP-24. The squadron flew long-distance reconnaissance flights over the Labrador and Davis Straits and Baffin Bay. A four-aircraft detachment was maintained at Thule, Greenland.

Jan 1953: VP-23 deployed to the Spanish Air Base at Reus, Tarragona, Spain, for one week of training with Spanish Air Force personnel. At the end of the week the squadron flew to Port Lyautey, F.M. The operations in Spain represented the first formal cooperation with the Spanish armed forces since before WWII.

Jun 1953 : VP-23 deployed to Argentia, Newfoundland, with a detachment at Thule AFB, Greenland. The detachments charted ice conditions in the surface shipping lanes between Newfoundland and Greenland, moved urgent supplies to remote bases, conducted research for the Hydrographic Office in Washington, transported personnel and dropped mail to fleet units at sea and ashore. Routine ASW patrols were also flown by the Argentia detachment.

7 May 1954: One of the VP-23 Neptunes, MA-5, crashed on takeoff from Nassau during exercises with the Atlantic Fleet, killing the entire crew.

16 Jul 1958: With the landing of U.S. Marines in Lebanon on 15 July, the squadron was quickly flown to NAF Keflavik, Iceland, the next day to assume station over the North Atlantic approaches. TheSeahawks remained on station at this location until the international climate had cooled, returning to NAS Brunswick in early September.


Contents

Following shakedown off northern New England, Saufley made several coastal escort runs and then prepared for duty in the South Pacific. She departed Norfolk on 9 September. Arriving at Nouméa, New Caledonia, on 2 December, Saufley commenced participation in the Guadalcanal campaign three days later.

1943 [ edit | edit source ]

Initially assigned to escort reinforcements from Espiritu Santo to Lunga Point, Saufley soon undertook antishipping sweeps in the waters north and west of Guadalcanal and conducted shore bombardment missions against enemy positions on the island. During the Japanese evacuation of Guadalcanal in late January and early February 1943, Saufley operated with Task Force 11 (TF11). On 19 February, she sailed for Lunga Roads to join with other units staging for Operation Cleanslate, the occupation of the Russell Islands.

During that operation, Saufley transported troops, towed landing craft to the target islands, and provided shore bombardment in support of the troops as they landed on Pavuvu and Banika islands on 21 February. From these islands, planes would be able to cover operations against Rendova.

In March, Saufley resumed escort and antisubmarine duties in the southern Solomons-New Caledonia-New Hebrides area. Following an abbreviated availability at Sydney, Australia, she returned to Nouméa and resumed escort work until the end of June. On 30 June, as Allied forces moved toward Rendova, Saufley bombarded Japanese shore installations there.

July and August found Saufley engaged in assault operations against New Georgia and escort missions to the New Hebrides and Vella Lavella. On 31 August, she received minor damage, but no casualties, from near misses by shore batteries in "the Slot".

At 10:11 on 15 September, while Saufley was en route to Espiritu Santo in company with Montgomery and two merchantmen, a torpedo wake was sighted. As Montgomery's sound gear was inoperative, Saufley initiated a search down the track of the torpedo wake. Over the period of the next three and one-half hours, she delivered five separate depth charge attacks against the submarine. At 14:43, the Japanese submarine RO-101, surfaced.

Saufley's five-inch (127 mm) batteries and machine guns opened up on the conning tower of the submarine. A PBY flying boat moved in and dropped two depth charges. The first charge missed the target by about 40 feet (12 m), but the second one hit it. When the splash subsided, the submarine was gone. An underwater explosion was heard and, by 17:35, diesel oil, covering an area of approximately one square mile (2.6 km²), marked the grave of RO-101.

During the remainder of September and well into October, Saufley was engaged in night antibarge patrols between Kolombangara and Choiseul. She sank four barges during this period but sustained damage from Japanese aerial bombs on the night of 1 October which resulted in the death of two crew members and the wounding of 11 others.

1944 [ edit | edit source ]

The months of November and December 1943 and January 1944 found Saufley performing escort duties for the reinforcement of Bougainville. In February, Saufley was engaged in the assault on the Green Islands which broke the Japanese Rabaul-Buka supply line and provided the Allies with another airfield near Rabaul. Antisubmarine patrols were followed by call fire support missions during the occupation of Emirau Island. This action, which completed the "ring around Rabaul", took Saufley into April. She had returned to the Emirau-Massau area when, on the morning of 7 April, she gained contact on a submerged submarine. Forty-five minutes and 18 depth charges later, two underwater explosions were heard. Within hours, oil covered the area. Postwar review of Japanese records identified the sunken submarine as Japanese submarine I-2. Following escort duties to the Admiralties, Saufley returned to Purvis Bay on 18 April whence she conducted exercises with TF 38 into May.

On 4 May, the destroyer sailed for Pearl Harbor. Arriving on 12 May, she sailed west again on 1 June as a unit of Task Group 51.18 (TG 51.18), the reserve force for Operation Forager, the conquest of the Marianas. On D-Day plus 1, 16 June, Saufley and the other escorts shepherded their charges into the transport unloading area west of Saipan. Saufley was then reassigned to call fire support duties. For the next month, she continued call fire support, screening, and shore bombardment operations in the Saipan-Tinian area. On 20 July, Saufley moved south for the invasion of Guam. Here, the destroyer provided call fire support for the assault troops. She returned to Tinian on the 23d and supported the landings there on 24 July. For the next week, she provided gunfire support and served on radar picket duty.

Remaining in the Marianas until 12 August, the destroyer then sailed for California, arriving at San Francisco with her squadron, Destroyer Squadron 22 (DesRon 22), at the end of the month. Overhaul took her into October. On 26 October, she again steamed west.

On 17 November, she arrived at Ulithi Atoll. Proceeding to Leyte Gulf, Saufley soon found herself engaged in antisubmarine action after moving into the Camotes Sea to search for a submarine reported to be in the area. Shortly after entering the area on 28 November, Japanese submarine I-46 Ώ] was located on the surface off Pilar Point, Ponson Island. In a multi-destroyer gun action involving Saufley, Renshaw, Waller, and Pringle (DD-477), Ώ] the submarine was sunk 45 minutes later.

On 29 November, Saufley was damaged in a kamikaze attack in Leyte Gulf. Ώ]

1945 [ edit | edit source ]

Returning to Leyte Gulf, Saufley lost one man and suffered considerable hull damage in an engagement with enemy planes on 29 November. Following repairs at the Admiralties, she proceeded to a 2 January 1945 rendezvous with the Lingayen attack force. Moving into the Sulu Sea on the 7th, Saufley shot down an attacking Japanese aircraft at dusk on the 8th. On the morning of 9 January, the formation stood into Lingayen Gulf. Saufley provided screening services as the assault waves landed in the Lingayen area. On the morning of 10 January, Saufley splashed another aircraft, this time a Val attempting to crash the destroyer. Saufley got underway on 12 January to return to Leyte Gulf. From Leyte Gulf, she escorted a convoy to Morotai and returned on 26 January. Sailing for Luzon, Saufley arrived off Nasugbu to support the landing there on 31 January. On 1 February, she sank an attacking Japanese boat. She then commenced call fire support which continued for four days. Saufley then set a course for Subic Bay.

The balance of February and most of March was spent in support operations in the areas of Manila Bay and Mindoro. Saufley participated in amphibious operations at Sanga-Sanga (31 March to 4 April) and Jolo (8 to 11 April) where she served as flagship, screening vessel, and call fire support ship.

The next two months found Saufley engaged in escort duties. She participated in the assault against Balikpapan, Borneo, on 1 July. The destroyer returned to Morotai on 22 July. She engaged in escort work between Leyte Gulf and Ulithi until the end of hostilities in mid-August.

In early September 1945, Saufley moved up to the Ryukyu Islands and then proceeded to the China coast. She assisted in minesweeping operations in the Yangtze delta area. The destroyer remained off the coast of China until she departed for home on 12 November. Arriving at San Diego at the end of the year, Saufley continued on to the east coast in mid-January 1946. During February, she underwent repairs at the New York Naval Shipyard. In early March, Saufley headed south to Charleston for inactivation.


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Product Description

USS Saufley DD 465

World War II Cruise Book (RARE FIND)

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Saufley cruise book during World War II. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • In Memoriam (Names and Rank)
  • Commanding Officer
  • Ships history
  • Detailed accounts of all war activities (21 pages)
  • Complete crew roster (Name and rank)
  • List of serving officers
  • List of awards and decorations showing type, nasme rank and dates awarded
  • Battle statistics log

Over 2 pictures and the ships story told on 53 pages.

Once you view this CD you will know what life was like on this Destroyer during World War II.

Additional Bonus:

  • 22 Minute Audio " American Radio Mobilizes the Homefront " WWII (National Archives)
  • 22 Minute Audio " Allied Turncoats Broadcast for the Axis Powers " WWII (National Archives)
  • 20 Minute Audio of a " 1967 Equator Crossing " (Not this ship but the Ceremony is Traditional)
  • 6 Minute Audio of " Sounds of Boot Camp " in the late 50's early 60's
  • Other Interesting Items Include:
    • The Oath of Enlistment
    • The Sailors Creed
    • Core Values of the United States Navy
    • Military Code of Conduct
    • Navy Terminology Origins (8 Pages)
    • Examples: Scuttlebutt, Chewing the Fat, Devil to Pay,
    • Hunky-Dory and many more.

    Why a CD instead of a hard copy book?

    • The pictures will not be degraded over time.
    • Self contained CD no software to load.
    • Thumbnails, table of contents and index for easy viewing reference.
    • View as a digital flip book or watch a slide show. (You set the timing options)
    • Back ground patriotic music and Navy sounds can be turned on or off.
    • Viewing options are described in the help section.
    • Bookmark your favorite pages.
    • The quality on your screen may be better than a hard copy with the ability to magnify any page.
    • Full page viewing slide show that you control with arrow keys or mouse.
    • Designed to work on a Microsoft platform. (Not Apple or Mac) Will work with Windows 98 or above.

    Personal Comment from "Navyboy63"

    The cruise book CD is a great inexpensive way of preserving historical family heritage for yourself, children or grand children especially if you or a loved one has served aboard the ship. It is a way to get connected with the past especially if you no longer have the human connection.

    If your loved one is still with us, they might consider this to be a priceless gift. Statistics show that only 25-35% of sailors purchased their own cruise book. Many probably wished they would have. It's a nice way to show them that you care about their past and appreciate the sacrifice they and many others made for you and the FREEDOM of our country. Would also be great for school research projects or just self interest in World War II documentation.

    We never knew what life was like for a sailor in World War II until we started taking an interest in these great books. We found pictures which we never knew existed of a relative who served on the USS Essex CV 9 during World War II. He passed away at a very young age and we never got a chance to hear many of his stories. Somehow by viewing his cruise book which we never saw until recently has reconnected the family with his legacy and Naval heritage. Even if we did not find the pictures in the cruise book it was a great way to see what life was like for him. We now consider these to be family treasures. His children, grand children and great grand children can always be connected to him in some small way which they can be proud of. This is what motivates and drives us to do the research and development of these great cruise books. I hope you can experience the same thing for your family.


    Watch the video: World of Warships Naval Legends: USS Kidd (July 2022).


Comments:

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